North Coast CNPS

Education

Workshop: A Primer on Sedges: Saturday, March 23, 2019

Instructor: Gordon Leppig

Target Audience: Professional and student botanists, consultants, regulators, and ecologists. Participants should have knowledge of basic plant terminology and use of dichotomous keys.

Participants will gain proficiency in:

  • Basic sedge terminology, morphology, and ecology.
  • Keying terminology and techniques using The Jepson Manual, 2nd Edition and other references.
  • Sight recognition of some ecologically dominant sedges based upon habitat.
  • Appreciation for the beauty, diversity, complexity, and ecological value of sedges.
  • A richer understanding of some of northern California’s most common and rare sedges.

Registration and Cost: $120 for CNPS members; $150 for non-members.

Register: Fill in the form below.

 

The last day to register is March 1.

If you are not a CNPS member, go to www.cnps.org/join to join now and save!

Description: This is an intensive introductory/intermediate course on sedge identification and keying with an emphasis on species occurring in Northern California and the Pacific Northwest. The workshop starts with an introductory review of sedge taxonomy, ecology, biogeography, and essential sedge keying terminology and morphology.  The rest of the day will be guided dissection and keying of specimens in the laboratory using a microscope and the Jepson Manual 2nd Edition.  Keying will be punctuated with guidance and commentary on keying groups and species characteristics. Many specimens will be available for review, dissection, and comparison. This workshop is geared for beginner and intermediate caricologists, but familiarity with keying plants in the Jepson Manual is required.  The emphasis will be on learning some of the most common and rare sedges in northern California.

Venue:  Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA.  Directions and additional information will be provided to registered participants about a week before the workshop.

Schedule: 9:00am to 5:00pm (1 Hr. lunch). Please arrive early to get setup.  

Materials Required: Please bring...

  • Quality dissecting equipment, including extra-fine forceps and a metric ruler
  • Hand lens
  • Notebook and writing implements
  • Lunch (or find lunch nearby in Arcata)
  • The Jepson Manual, 2nd Edition
  • Field Guide to the Sedges of the Pacific Northwest 1st or 2nd Edition (recommended)

Materials Provided: CNPS will provide handouts, diverse material for keying and comparison, and dissecting scopes. Coffee, tea, fruit, and baked goods will be available during the morning session.

About the Instructor:

Gordon Leppig is a Senior Environmental Scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and has been a student of sedges for over 20 years.

Workshop: A Primer on Sedges: Saturday, March 17, 2018

Instructor: Gordon Leppig

Target Audience: Professional and student botanists, consultants, regulators, and ecologists. Participants should have knowledge of basic plant terminology and use of dichotomous keys.

Participants will gain proficiency in:

  • Basic sedge terminology, morphology, and ecology.
  • Keying terminology and techniques using The Jepson Manual, 2nd Edition and other references.
  • Sight recognition of some ecologically dominant sedges based upon habitat.
  • Appreciation for the beauty, diversity, complexity, and ecological value of sedges.
  • A richer understanding of some of northern California’s most common and rare sedges.

Registration and Cost: $100 for CNPS members; $130 for non-members.

Register: Fill in the form below.

The last day to register is February 28.

If you are not a CNPS member, go to www.cnps.org/join to join now and save!

Description: This is an intensive introductory/intermediate course on sedge identification and keying with an emphasis on species occurring in Northern California and the Pacific Northwest. The workshop starts with an introductory review of sedge taxonomy, ecology, biogeography, and essential sedge keying terminology and morphology.  The rest of the day will be guided dissection and keying of specimens in the laboratory using a microscope and the Jepson Manual 2nd Edition.  Keying will be punctuated with guidance and commentary on keying groups and species characteristics. Many specimens will be available for review, dissection, and comparison. This workshop is geared for beginner and intermediate caricologists, but familiarity with keying plants in the Jepson Manual is required.  The emphasis will be on learning some of the most common and rare sedges in northern California.

Venue:  Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA.  Directions and additional information will be provided to registered participants about a week before the workshop.

Schedule: 9:00am to 5:00pm (1 Hr. lunch). Please arrive early to get setup.  

Materials Required: Please bring...

    • Quality dissecting equipment, including extra-fine forceps and a metric ruler
    • Hand lens
    • Notebook and writing implements
    • Lunch (or find lunch nearby in Arcata)
  • The Jepson Manual, 2nd Edition
  • Field Guide to the Sedges of the Pacific Northwest 1st or 2nd Edition (recommended)

Materials Provided: CNPS will provide handouts, diverse material for keying and comparison, and dissecting scopes. Coffee, tea, fruit, and baked goods will be available during the morning session.

About the Instructor:

Gordon Leppig is a Senior Environmental Scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and was for 10 years the HSU Vascular Plant Herbarium collections manager.  He has been a student of sedges for over 20 years and has previously taught plant workshops for CNPS, The HSU Natural History Museum, and the Jepson Herbarium.

Spring Wildflower Show and Native Plant Sale
the North Coast celebration of wild California plants
May 3-4-5, 2019

NOTE: Same great events, now in TWO PLACES--Jefferson Community Center and Freshwater Farms.

Spring Wildflower Show  (see Plant Sale below)
            Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka.
                        May 3, Friday, 2-8 p.m.
                        May 4 & 5, Saturday & Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
                                    Contact: Susan 672-3346

  • oak woodland displays and lectures
  • hundreds of fresh flowers, native and non-native
  • speakers on oak woodlands, Karuks and oaks, native plant gardening, and painting oaks
  • Wiyot land management
  • Wildflower art workshop Friday, 7 p.m. 707-677-0927
  • experts to identify your wild plant
  • invasive plant game
  • wildflower posters and postcards and plant books to buy
  • wild, edible plants
  • plants of the dunes
  • Admission free. Everyone welcome.  Handicap accessible.

 Native Plant Sale
            Freshwater Farms Reserve,
5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka,
a property of the Northcoast Regional Land Trust, where cows and coho live side-by-side
                        May 4 & 5.  Saturday & Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
                                    Contact: Chris 826-0259

  • over 120 species grown by our chapter
  • thousands of plants from five local nurseries
  • 3 species of milkweeds and 20 of cheerful annuals
  • 24 species of beautiful bulbs
  • many species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees
  • don't forget the ferns and succulents
  • experienced gardeners to help you; plants for a variety of planting needs
  • list of species at www.northcoastcnps.org>Gardening>Native Plant Sales
  • cash, check, or credit card
  • Please bring a box to carry home your plants.

 

Speakers at the Wildflower Show

 Friday, May 3
            7 p.m. Art Night. Artists Annie Reid, Joyce Jonte, and Patricia Sennott will provide a creative and congenial atmosphere for artists, from beginners to professionals, to sit down together and draw the flowers of their choice borrowed from the show.  Please tell us you are coming 677-0927.

Saturday, May 4
           
11 a.m. "Gardening with Native Plants in 2019." Naturalist and gardener Pete Haggard will tell (with photos) his recent thoughts about providing native plants for native wildlife.  Bring your bugs to be identified.
              3 p.m. "Oak Stewardship by Native Peoples."  Frank Lake will show and tell how local tribes use oaks and associated plants and how they restore oak woodlands.

Sunday, May 5
            12 noon. "Oaks, the Forgotten Old Growth." Yana Valachovic reports on studies of local oak age, on conifer encroachment of oak woodlands, why we need to protect oaks now, and new policies that facilitate management.
              1:30 p.m. "An Artist Encounters Oaks." On a trail of art and stories, local artist Kathy O'Leary will share her two-year visual exploration and appreciation of California oaks,

Displays at the Wildflower Show

Oak Woodlands.  Learn what they are, where they are, why they are important, and how they are threatened.

Native American Cultural Plants.  Edible, medicinal, and cultural-use plants of importance to the Wiyot Tribe.

Wild Edible Plants.  See favorite edible, native plants that you can grow outside your door for your consumption, while providing native habitat for native wildlife.

Invasive Plants.  Learn what common garden species are invading our wildlands. 

Plants of the Dunes.  Friends of the Dunes brings a sampling from the dunes to you.

Oak Woodlands in Six Rivers National Forest.  Stunning photographs of a beautiful habitat and its flower inhabitants. 

 


Teachers' Resources - these are downloadable .pdf files

Flower parts (12 KB) Flower activities (5 KB)
Pollination (222 KB) Uses of native plants (4 KB)
Five flower types (508 KB) Is it OK to pick wildflowers? (5 KB)

 

 

 

 

 

The CNPS North Coast Chapter Research Grant

The North Coast Chapter of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) is offering a research grant (2 awards per year) of up to $1,500 for studies of local, native plants. The grant is available to undergraduate and graduate students at Humboldt State University and College of the Redwoods. Its purpose is to encourage learning about native plants in Humboldt, Trinity, Siskiyou and Del Norte Counties and to support projects that will advance knowledge of them.

To apply for the grant submit the following by March 1, two pages please:

  • Title of the project, applicant’s name, address, phone number, email address, and the date submitted.
  • Estimated time frame for project.
  • Description of the project: Outline the purposes, objectives, hypotheses where appropriate, and methods of data collection and analysis. Highlight aspects of the work that you believe are particularly important and creative. How will it advance our knowledge of our local native plants?
  • Description of the final product.
  • Budget: Summarize intended use of funds. Our grant does not approve the outright purchase of capital equipment or high-end items such as computers and software.
  • Academic status (school, graduate student, undergrad)
  • Letter of support from a sponsor, such as an academic supervisor, major professor, professional associate or colleague should accompany your application.
  • Your signature, as the person performing the project and the one responsible for dispersing the funds. All of the information related to your application may be submitted electronically.

Application materials should be submitted electronically (in PDF format) to Dr. Erik Jules at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and Michael Kauffmann at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Grant recipients will be selected by a committee approved by the chapter’s steering committee and consisting of at least one HSU staff and one non-HSU chapter member.

The grant recipient will be expected to give a brief presentation of his/her project at a chapter meeting and in the chapter’s newsletter.

Recipients may reapply and receive a second grant, but no more.

DOWNLOAD APPLICATION

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The North Coast Chapter of the California Native Plant Society is a group of enthusiastic people sharing their knowledge of California's native plants, studying native plants, and speaking up for native plants in conservation issues. The public is welcome at our events. We encourage membership in CNPS to make our voice for native plants stronger. The mission of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) is to increase understanding and appreciation of California's native plants and to conserve them and their natural habitats through science, education, advocacy, horticulture, and land stewardship.

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