North Coast CNPS

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You are here: Home Activities Past events

EVENTS 2015

Please watch for later additions on our Web site (www.northcoastcnps.org) or sign up for e-mail announcements ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).

Evening programs are free, public programs on the second Wednesday of each month, September through May, at the Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Rd., Arcata. Refreshments at 7:00 p.m.; program at 7:30 p.m. For information or to suggest a speaker or topic contact Michael Kauffmann at 407-7686 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Outings are open to everyone, not just members. All levels of expertise, from beginners to experienced botanizers, are welcome. Address questions about physical ability requirements to the leader. Contact the leader so you can be informed of any changes.

January 14, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

" Delving into the Cryptic Lives of Gall Wasps" with Dr. John DeMartini. Wasps of the family Cynipidae form galls on a variety of plants, particularly Rosaceae (rose) and Fagaceae (oaks) in northern California. John’s presentation will illustrate the interesting natural history of the wasp’s relationship to native plants by illustrating life cycles, galls sites, and predatory interactions. Dr. DeMartini is a Humboldt State University Professor emeritus with a passion for regional natural history.

February 11, Wed. 7:30 p.m. "Making It How It Was: Dune and Salt Marsh Restoration around Humboldt Bay"

Andrea Pickart of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge will evaluate the 25-year history of dune restoration on our coast, especially projects at Lanphere and at Ma-le'l Dunes. She will also discuss the research and monitoring being done to address the challenges of sea level rise associated with climate change. Michael Cipra, executive director of the North Coast Regional Land Trust, will share the inspiring results of his organization's five-year-old project to restore a 35-acre tidal wetland at Freshwater Farms Reserve. The project created a diverse salt marsh as well as estuary habitat for juvenile Coho and Chinook Salmon, Cutthroat and Steelhead Trout, and the endangered Tidewater Goby. A second phase of salt marsh restoration is being planned.

February 28, Saturday.

Requa to Lagoon Creek Day Hike (Coastal Trail, Hidden Beach Section, in Redwood National Park). We have found spring happening on this trail in February in previous years. See the March 2010 issue of Darlingtonia for a write-up of our most recent trip here.(It's on our web site.) Osoberry, Red-flowering Currant, Western Coltsfoot, Candyflower, Milkmaids, Smith's Fairy Bells, Western Trillium and Giant Purple Trillium (Trillium ovatum and kurabayashii) in bloom,10 species of fern, 6 of umbellifers,….. Is that enough temptation? We will shuttle cars to Lagoon Creek, where Highway 101 meets the ocean north of Klamath, and then start walking from the spectacular Requa trailhead on the north side of the mouth of the Klamath River. It's a 4-mile, gentle hike. We might visit Hidden Beach along the way. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or arrange a place farther north. Dress for being in the weather all day! Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. Please tell Carol you are coming 822-2015.

March 11, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

"Burning the Bald Hills: Managing Savanna and Woodland Ecosystems in Redwood National Park" with Eamon Engber, Interagency Fire Ecologist with Redwood National Park. A problem 100 years in the making, the suppression of fires in what is now Redwood National Park has caused park ecologists to undertake active management strategies to bring about positive changes for native plants and animals. We will explore oak woodland and serpentine ecosystems and discover the fire and non-fire alternatives used to achieve renewed native biodiversity. Issues the park is addressing include native conifer encroachment, small-tree mortality, and understory response to various treatments. Eamon will share how this management is tied to the proposed vegetation management projects in the Little Bald Hills serpentine pine savanna.

March 14, Saturday.

Flint Ridge Trail Day Hike. This trail in Redwood National Park just south of the mouth of the Klamath River will take us through majestic, upland old growth Redwoods, with blooms of Milkmaids, Smith's Fairy Bells, and Redwood Violets, as well as along the banks of Marshall Pond and through Red Alder-Sitka Spruce forest. The group will decide whether to do the full trail, 4.6 miles with 800 ft. elevation gain and loss, by shuttling vehicles, or do a shorter, up-and-back version. We will also check one of our favorite stands of Giant Purple Trillium along Klamath Beach Rd. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or arrange a place farther north. Dress for being in the weather all day! Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. Please tell Carol you are coming 822-2015 .

April 8, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m.

"Northern California Botanical Rarities: what to look for, how to find them." The North Coast Chapter's territory includes home to many rare plants. CNPS Rare Plant Botanist and veteran botanical explorer Aaron Sims will impress you with how many, provide some current knowledge about them, and point out what we need to learn. He will introduce a few recently described rare species from northern California, as well as review some rare plants that have gone entirely unnoticed in recent decades. We will explore plants like Blue Creek Stonecrop (Sedum citrinum), Shy Monkeyflower (Erythranthe sookensis), Mountain Hairgrass (Vahlodea atropurpurea), and many more!

April 11-19 Native Plant Week.

Events related to native plants offered by CNPS and others

April 11, Sat. 9:00-12 noon.

Restoration at Trinidad State Beach. Pulling ivy! Wear sturdy shoes for walking off trail. Gloves and tools provided, or bring your own. Meet at the paved parking lot off Stagecoach Rd. 707-677-3109. A State Parks event.

April 11,Saturday, 10 a.m.-12 noon.

"Letting the Bay Back in: Experience a Salt Marsh Restoration," a walk at Freshwater Farms Reserve of the Northcoast Regional Land Trust. Join NRLT executive director Michael Cipra and Carol Ralph of California Native Plant Society to see if botanically invaded bottomlands can be restored to a tidal marsh of diverse native plants. Along the level, mowed path (3/4 mile) see thriving clumps of the rare Lyngby's Sedge and lush leaves of the dramatic Coastal Angelica; in the marsh see two species of arrowgrass, which is not a grass. Boots are not necessary, but advisable, as the grass may be wet. Meet at 10 a.m. at the farm stand by the Freshwater Farms barn, 5851 Myrtle Ave. For information call 822-2242.

April 11, Saturday, 2 - 3:30 p.m.

Plant Walk at Arcata Marsh. Join long-time Friends of Arcata Marsh docents Rich Ridenhour and Leslie Anderson, both authors of A Photographic Guide to 101 Common Plants of the Arcata Marsh & Wildlife Sanctuary (which you can buy at the Marsh Interpretive Center), for a walk to appreciate the common plants in this favorite outdoor area. Meet at 600 South G St., Arcata. 826-2359 arcatamarshfriends.org. Sponsored by Friends of Arcata Marsh.

April 12, Sun. 9:30-a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Restoration at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center. Friends of the Dunes. Meet at 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. 444-1397

April 12, Sunday, 1:00-3:00 p.m..

"Native vs Non-native Plants at the Edge of the Bay," a walk on Eureka's Hikshari Trail, presented by Humboldt Baykeeper and Hikshari Trail Stewards. Susan Penn will share plants, ecology, and local history along a 3/4-mile section of this level trail. Meet the succulent pickleweed, the dreaded poison hemlock, and the cheerful seaside daisy. Thanks to support from the California Coastal Conservancy, our staff and docents lead bilingual tours in Spanish and English. Meet at 1p.m. at the vista point at the end of Truesdale St. off south Broadway in Eureka. For more information: 707-825-1020 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or www.humboldtbaykeeper.org.

April 12. Sunday.

Horse Mountain or Prairie Creek Day Trip. Horse Mt. is often snow-covered in April. What are mountain plants doing when snow is lacking in April? If winter continues dry, we will find out! If the weather becomes wintry, we will go someplace lower elevation, probably a trail in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park to see trilliums. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Dress for being in the weather all day! Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. For actual destination check the web site or call Carol, 822-2015 .

Apr. 12, Sunday, all day.

South Fork Trinity River Trail Hike. Much to see and hear on this perennial favorite National Forest trail off of Highway 299 just east of Willow Creek. Redbud, Baby Blue Eyes, Black-headed Grosbeak. Breathtaking vistas of the river’s gorge below, and trekking poles will be a plus. A profusion of wildflowers, especially since the 2008 Hell’s Half mosaic burn. No dogs. Dress for the day’s weather. Hikers must have water, lunch, sun/cold protection, good footwear, and some agility to cross a couple of small tributaries. Moderate difficulty, 6.5 miles, 500-1000 feet elevation change. Carpools: Meet 8:30 am at Ray’s shopping center in Valley West. A North Group Sierra Club outing. Leader Ned, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , 825-3652. Heavy rain cancels.

April 12, Sunday. 2 p.m.

Old Town Native Plant Garden. Right there by the sidewalk and parking lot at Second H Streets, Eureka, you will find a diverse, interesting, and useful garden of native plants. Besides answering questions, garden creator Monty Caid of Lost Foods Nursery will talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 14, Tues. 10 a.m.-12 noon.

Volunteer work at the CNPS Nursery in Bayside. Meet at the Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd., 9:50 a.m.. 826-0259

April 14, Tuesday. 12 noon-1 p.m.

Native Plants in an Urban Garden in Arcata. See the native plants and the wildlife they harbor in the Arcata Community Center Native Plant & Wildlife Garden, a project of the North Coast Chapter of CNPS. Naturalist, gardener, and author Pete Haggard will be there to help you see and to answer questions. Walk from the Community Center up the path left of Healthsport, or walk down from 7th Street. 839-0307.

April 14, Tues. 2 p.m.

Lost Foods Native Plant Nursery and Sanctuary, Redwood Acres. Native plants have been thriving in this garden and nursery created by Monty Caid at the edge of the fairgrounds. He will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Find the nursery and sanctuary at the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds in Eureka, 3750 Harris Street. Enter the fairgrounds at Gate #3 at the end of Harris Street and turn left and follow the road to the garden area. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 15, Wed. 2 p.m.

Ryan House Lost Foods Native Plant Sanctuary. Knowledgeable and experienced native plant gardener Monty Caid, of Lost Foods, created a native plant garden at this historic, Eureka house, 1000 E St. While you enjoy the attractive garden Monty will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 15, Wednesday. 7-9 p.m.

"Ocean Friendly Gardening and Native Plant Landscaping." Experienced designers, landscapers, and gardeners Lia Webb (GHD and Surfrider Foundation), and Eric Johnson (Samara Restoration) will introduce ecological landscape design principles that include Slow-the-Flow, Low Impact Development (LID), and Ocean Friendly Gardening, all with native plants in mind. The presentation will highlight how these concepts are applicable to a range of settings, climates, urban and rural, coastal and mountain regions. They will share local case studies including a parking lot stormwater treatment project and a commercial building LEED renovation. Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , 443-8326

April 16, Thurs. 2 p.m. .

Lost Foods Native Plant Nursery and Sanctuary, Redwood Acres. Native plants have been thriving in this garden and nursery created by Monty Caid at the edge of the fairgrounds. He will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Find the nursery and sanctuary at the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds in Eureka, 3750 Harris Street. Enter the fairgrounds at Gate #3 at the end of Harris Street and turn left and follow the road to the garden area. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 17, Fri. 11 a.m.

"The Importance of California Native Plants" by Monty Caid at the Eureka Sequoia Garden Club meeting. First Covenant Church, 2526 J St., Eureka. Bring lunch. 442-1387

April 18, Saturday. 10 a.m. start.

Salmon River Trail Wildflower Day Hike. We will walk along the road to Hippo Rock and continue along the trail for a total distance of about three miles there and back. Trail conditions can be uneven, but otherwise easy to moderate. Meet at the Panamnik building in Orleans (same building as the Post Office, 38150 Hwy 96) at 10 a.m. Please bring a lunch and water. Finish by mid-afternoon. Please contact Tanya Chapple at 530-627-3202 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

April 18, Saturday, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Native Plants in Yards and Forest. Join Carol Ralph for a walk from the Community Center to Arcata Community Forest and back to see native plants in private landscapes and in a redwood forest. Besides identification, questions like "What IS a native plant?" "Why plant natives in your yard?" "How do you mimic in a yard a wild, native habitat?" will be considered. Hopefully, trillium will be blooming in the forest. The walk is about 3 miles on sidewalks and good paths, with about 250 ft. elevation gain. Call 826-7050 to register for this free trip sponsored by California Native Plant Society at Godwit Days, or register for Godwit Days at www.godwitdays.org

April 18, Sat. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Patrick's Point State Park Earth Day Restoration Event. The eleventh annual work day to remove invasive, non-native plants such as English ivy. Refreshments and picnic lunch provided! Removing invasive plants is a moderate activity, and participants are encouraged to wear sturdy shoes for walking off trail. Gloves and tools are provided, but feel free to bring your own. Work locations are less than a half-mile hike from the meeting location. For more information please contact Michelle Forys at 707-677-3109 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

April 18, Sat. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Restoration at the Lanphere Dunes. Friends of the Dunes. Meet at Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Rd., Arcata, to carpool. 444-1397

April 18, Sat. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Patrick's Point State Park Earth Day Restoration Event. The eleventh annual work day to remove invasive, non-native plants such as English ivy. Refreshments and picnic lunch provided! Removing invasive plants is a moderate activity, and participants are encouraged to wear sturdy shoes for walking off trail. Gloves and tools are provede, but feel free to bring your own. Work locations are less than a half-mile hike from the meeting location. For more information please contact Michelle Forys at 707-677-3109 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

April 18, Sat. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Wildearth Garden. Donna Wildearth loves flowers and loves native plants. This passion plus her experience and thoughtful design have created an eye-catching and pleasing garden, which she is willing to share as part of this celebration of native plants. 2904 Williams St., Eureka. Garden Visions Landscape 707- 476-0273.

April 18, Sat. 2 p.m.  

Lost Foods Native Plant Nursery and Sanctuary, Redwood Acres. Native plants have been thriving in this garden and nursery created by Monty Caid at the edge of the fairgrounds. He will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Find the nursery and sanctuary at the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds in Eureka, 3750 Harris Street. Enter the fairgrounds at Gate #3 at the end of Harris Street and turn left and follow the road to the garden area. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 19, Sunday. 12:00-3:30 p.m.

Godwit Days walk at Mal'el North. Join a Friends of the Dunes naturalist for a bird (and plant) walk at the Ma-le'l Dunes Unit of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge as part of the Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival. Register through Godwit Days, godwitdays.org, (707) 826-7050.

April 25, Saturday. 10:00 a.m. to12 p.m.

Ferns of the Dunes. Ferns are distinctive and popular for the exotic texture they add to vegetation. Carol Ralph will introduce eight species of our common ferns in the easy setting at the riparian edge of the Lanphere Dunes and talk about some of the amazing aspects of fern life. Walking will be about 100 yards. Bring a hand lens. Meet at Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road in Arcata and carpool to the protected site. Co-sponsored with Friends of the Dunes. Please register by calling 444-1397.

May 1-3, Friday through Sunday.

SPRING WILDFLOWER SHOW and NATIVE PLANT SALE at the Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Dr., Manila. An exciting, annual gathering of wildflowers (both native and non-native) and people who love them. The SHOW is open Friday 1-4 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Find details on the web stie. If you want to help, call Carol 822-2015 The NATIVE PLANT SALE is open Friday and Saturday only, 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.. Hundreds of volunteer- and nursery-grown native plants, chosen by our experienced gardeners to be good additions to local yards. They will be on hand to help you choose and answer your questions. Plant sales help fund our chapter! Volunteer help is always needed, to help grow plants and to help at the sale in many capacities. Anna 826-7247.

May 9, Saturday.

Flora of Snow Camp Mountain, Day Hike. Come explore the wild woods and streams of the Snow Camp Mtn. area. See for yourself why Joseph P. Tracy collected so many intriguing specimens from this enchanting landscape. Bianca Hayashi will lead a walk in some of the most beautiful, and floristically rich, areas of the Snow Camp Mtn. region on private Green Diamond Resource Company property. Have you had the chance to mingle with fawn lily or bunchberry? This may be your opportunity. Most hiking will be done off trail on this excursion, so sturdy hiking shoes will be necessary. Expect to hike as much as 1.5 miles in total. Expect to be outside for the day and bring layered clothing; Snow Camp is at approximately 4000 ft. in elevation. Bring water and a lunch. Driving out to Snow Camp will require 4WD vehicles, so carpooling will likely be necessary. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). We will return in the afternoon. Please let Carol know that you plan on attending 707-822-2015.

May 9, Saturday. 10 a.m. start.

Twin Lakes Wildflower Walk, Orleans area. We hope to catch the azalea bloom at Twin Lakes as well as investigate the other plants there. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans (same building as the Post Office, 38150 Hwy 96) at 10 a.m., or at the bottom of Slate Creek Rd at 10:30. Please bring a lunch and water. Finish by mid-afternoon. Please contact Tanya Chapple at 530-627-3202 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

May 13, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

"The Bigfoot Trail: A Celebration of Klamath Mountain Flora." The Bigfoot Trail travels 360 miles across the Klamath Mountains from the subalpine slopes of the Yolla Bolly-Middle Eel Wilderness to the temperate rainforest in Crescent City. Michael Kauffmann, the trail's originator, will take you on a photographic journey along the trail and celebrate both the common and rare plants along the way, including 32 species of conifers. To get ready for summer hiking, an updated map set and write-up for the route will be available with a portion of the proceeds going to North Coast CNPS! Visit www.bigfoottrail.org to preview the route.

May 14, Thursday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Tour the Lost Coast Brewery Native Plant Garden at the Humboldt Botanical Garden with volunteer curator Mark Moore. Since retiring from Calif. Fish & Game Mark has devoted his expertise and time to this garden. Site Manager Terri Kramer will be on hand also. This special tour is to encourage CNPS members to see the wonderful things that have been growing at the HBG. Bring a sack lunch to enjoy in the garden and plan to browse in other sections. Admission is free to members; you can join at the gate for $25 or $35. Admission for non-members is $5 (seniors) or $8. Admission fees help keep this non-profit alive! Find the garden at 707 Tompkins Hill Rd, Eureka. Turn at the North Entrance of the College of the Redwoods. 442-5139

May 16-17, Saturday-Sunday.

Shelter Cove and King Range Day Trip or Overnight. After attending a native plant workshop by the Lost Coast Interpretive Association in Shelter Cove, including a guided walk on the Shelter Cove Nature Trail, we will walk the Hidden Valley Trail (2.7 miles) before settling for the night at Wailaki Campground (or someplace civilized in Shelter Cove). Sunday morning we will hike the Chemise Mountain Trail (3.0 miles round trip), possibly adding all or part of the Chinquapin Loop Mid-afternoon we'll head for home. Tell Carol you are coming, to learn specific meeting places. 822-2015.

May 23, Saturday.

Two Azalea Reserves, Two Short Walks. State Parks holds two native plant treasures, two natural stands of Western Azaleas. We will visit both, hopefully blooming, to appreciate their beauty, fragrance, diversity, and associated habitat. We will walk the short loop trails at each reserve, with a stop in between for bring-your-own picnic lunch at the native plant garden at the Trinidad Museum. Meet at 10:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) to carpool; at 10:15 a.m. at the Azalea State Natural Reserve (McKinleyville); between 12 noon and 1 p.m. at the Trinidad Museum; or about 1:30 p.m. at the Stagecoach Hill (Kane Rd.) Azalea Reserve. It's good to tell Carol where you will meet us 707-822-2015. Where to find the reserves: Azalea State Natural Reserve: Exit onto North Bank Rd. off 101 just north of the Mad River; after about one mile turn left on Azalea Dr., and shortly after that, left into the parking lot. Two loops about half mile each. Stagecoach Hill Azalea Reserve: From 101 north of Big Lagoon, at mile-marker 112.5 turn right onto Kane Rd. (It's small!), then left at a junction, then follow the small road to a small parking area at the end under spruces.

June 6, Saturday. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Jacoby Creek Forest Redwood Ecology Hike. Jacoby Creek Forest is normally closed to the public. This is a rare opportunity to survey its trees and plants. The walk is limited to 25 people. To make a reservation call 707-822-8184 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Meet at the parking lot behind City hall on 7th Street to carpool to the Jacoby Creek forest. Bring water, wear sturdy hiking shoes, be prepared for a moderate hike with two stream crossings. Offered by the City of Arcata.

June 6, Saturday. 9 a.m. start.

Haypress Meadow Wildflower Hike (& optional backpack overnight). Explore meadows of the western Marble Mountains. This is an all day hike with the option to backpack and camp overnight. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans (same building as the Post Office, 38150 Hwy 96) at 9 a.m., or at the Stanshaw Trailhead at 10:30. Please contact Tanya Chapple at 530-627-3202 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

June 20, Saturday.

Rare Plant Treasure Hunt--Trinity Monkeyflower (Erythranthe trinitiensis). Once again the North Coast Chapter of CNPS is partnering with Six Rivers National Forest to search for a rare plant. We will head up Highway 299 to about 4,000 ft elevation in the Horse Mountain Botanical Area of Six Rivers National Forest. We will visit a site where the recently described Trinity Monkeyflower was seen last year and then attempt of find additional occurrences in the vicinity. Be prepared for short hikes off gravel roads and for changeable, mountain weather. Bring boots, lunch, water, hats, and sunscreen. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) to carpool. Contact John McRae at 707-441-3513 for information, to say you are coming, and to tell him if you can bring a 4-wheel-drive vehicle.

June 27, Saturday.

Plant Gall Survey Trek. A search for interesting and diverse plant galls takes us back to Titlow Hill Rd. and Horse Mountain area in Six Rivers National Forest (off Highway 299) with naturalist John DeMartini. At various roadside stops we will wander a bit, inspecting especially oaks (Quercus spp.) for these amazing homes for certain insect larvae. We will make the most of the botany available, which should be wonderful. Be prepared for walking off-trail and for changeable, mountain weather (cold or hot). Bring lunch and plenty of water, and if you have one, a hand lens. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 9:30 a.m. to carpool. Return by 5 p.m. (or sooner, driver's choice). It's good to tell us you're coming: 822-2015

July 10-11-12, Friday p.m.-Sunday.

East Boulder Lake and Scott Mt. Summit. A two-mile hike, after an hour's drive from our camp will put us at 6,700 ft in the wide basin of East Boulder Lake in the Scott Mountains, south of Callahan. We will car-camp Friday and Saturday nights at Scott Mt. Summit Campground (5400 ft elevation) on Route 3 north of Weaverville, 3 hours from Arcata, in Shasta Trinity National Forest. Saturday we will maximize time at East Boulder Lake among the Western White Pine and alpine flowers. Sunday we will explore the camp area (one of our favorites) and Pacific Crest Trail before heading home. Important: tell Carol if you are thinking of coming! 822-2015 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it '; document.write( '' ); document.write( addy_text58344 ); document.write( '<\/a>' ); //--> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

August 9, Sunday.

Pine Ridge Prairies Day Hike. "Prairies" and the oak woodlands mixed with them are two of our shrinking habitats, as lack of fires and reduced grazing allow conifers to grow, shading out a diverse mix of grasses and herbs, as well as the oaks. Many of our favorite sun-loving wildflowers thrive in these open habitats. A few may still be blooming when we explore the prairies of Pine Ridge, making use of new trails created by the Bureau of Land Management, Redwood Coast Mountain Bike Association, and the Humboldt Trails Council on this ridge in the BLM's Lacks Creek Management Area (north off Bair Rd., between Redwood Creek and Hoopa). We will hike about 4 miles. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Dress for being in mountain weather all day. At elevation 3,600 ft. it can be hotter or colder than on the coast. Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. Carol 822-2015

September 8, Tuesday. 7:00 p.m.

Friends of the Dunes hosts "Ecology of Japanese Dunes" with Professor Yoshinori Kodama (geomorphologist) and Professor Dal Nagamatsu (plant ecologist). Tottori Prefecture is on the Sea of Japan on Honshu Island. Like our North Coast, the Tottori coast is rugged, tectonically active, and subject to high winds and strong storms. The Japanese scientists, including two graduate students, wish to compare similarities and differences in how dunes form and migrate and how dune plants respond to their ever-changing habitats. They also wish to learn how Americans manage our dune ecosystems. They and their American hosts will be visiting coastal dunes in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties during the week of September 7.

September 9, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m.

"Tropical Fungi: New Insights from the Guiana Shield and Congo Basin." Dr. Terry Henkel, mycologist at Humboldt State University, will review his work in both Guyana (South America) and the Congo (Africa) exploring the world's largest areas of intact tropical forests to document new species of fungi and study their ecological relationships with green plants. His work surprised ecologists by finding on both continents that fungal diversity approached that of species-rich temperate forests. The discovery of forests dominated by pea family and dipterocarp family trees stimulated research into their ecology and mycology. Ectomycorrhizal relationships between fungi and trees emerged as important ecological forces. On this virtual tour of tropical forests Dr. Henkel will give us an appreciation of what we can't see under our feet as we appreciate the majesty and beauty of forests above our heads.

September 12, Saturday. 10 am-3 pm.

Native Plant Sale at the chapter nursery at Jacoby Creek Land Trust's Kokte Ranch, 2182 Old Arcata Rd, Bayside. Hundreds of native plants grown by our volunteers and three local native plant nurseries will be available. Experienced gardeners will help customers choose plants and will give brief talks about some of the plants on hand, half-hourly starting at noon. Fall is time to plant, and these plants are priced to sell. Native plants can lower your water use. Most are edible or useful in some way. They attract birds, butterflies, bees, and other native wildlife. And they are beautiful and interesting! For information see our web site www.northcoastcnps.org or call 707-822-2015 or 707-826-7257.

September 13, Sunday.

Elk RiverSpit Day Hike. Where there's water, there will be plants still green, maybe even blooming. And sand plants are hardy. Elk River Spit has salt water, fresh water, and sand, so we're sure to find something interesting. We will walk about 3 miles, mostly on firm sand, including crossing the river on a train tressel. Bring lunch and water; be prepared to be outside all day. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) to carpool, or at 9:45 at the Park & Ride at Herrick Ave exit at the south end of Eureka. Return mid- to late-afternoon. Tell Carol you're coming, in case plans change (weather): 822-2015.

September 26, Saturday.

Woody Plants and Galls on Horse Mountain, revised field trip. Late summer galls are remarkably scarce this year, but we can look again at the spring galls we found in June in the Titlow Hill Rd. and Horse Mountain area in Six Rivers National Forest (off Highway 299). Oaks, silktassel, manzanitas, and tobacco brush are popular hosts of the insects that produce galls, but we will look at anything botanically interesting among the diverse shrubs and trees in this nearby mountain area. Any flowers blooming this late will certainly get some attention. Be prepared for walking off-trail at various roadside stops and for changeable, mountain weather (cold or hot). Bring lunch and plenty of water. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 9:30 a.m. to carpool. Return by 5 p.m. Tell us you're coming, in case plans change: 822-2015

October 4, Sunday.

Tolowa Dunes Day, a field trip. We'll walk a trail in Tolowa Dunes State Park, Crescent City, comparing this dune forest, dune hollows, and dune mat with what we know from Humboldt Bay area. Probably we will visit some wetland plants along the lake. We might decide to help pull European Beach Grass with the Tolowa Dunes Stewards' restoration volunteers. We might also visit the sweeping coastal prairie on Point St. George and check the bluffs for succulents, mist maidens, and crowberry. And it's fun to stop at Whaler's Island in the harbor to see the hemlock parsley. Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 8:30 a.m. to carpool, or arrange another place. Return late afternoon. Carol 822-2015.

October 14, Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.

A Tolowa Coast Evening. Long-time Tolowa Dunes resident, nature writer, organizer, and advocate Susan Calla will present “The Tolowa Coast, a Liquid Landscape,” an overview of the diverse dune, wetland, lagoon, and shoreline habitats and species found within Tolowa Dunes State Park and the Lake Earl Wildlife Area in Del Norte County. Laura Julian, biotechnician at Redwood National and State Parks and leader of countless public walks and work parties in the Tolowa Dunes, studied the bees there. In her talk “Food Deserts and Invasive Plants, or, Where Can a Bee Find a Snug Bed and a Good Meal?" she will share some conclusions about the links between food, nest availability, and invasive plants.

November 7, Saturday.

Shrubs from Coast to Mountain. With no flowers to look for and with two new shrub books in hand, it's a good day to see how many species of shrubs we can find in one day while still having a good time. The route could include dune forest, Azalea State Reserve, Blue Lake Hatchery or Industrial Loop, Chezem Rd., Lord Ellis Summit, Vista Point, Berry Summit, Horse Mountain, and East Fork Willow Creek. We can decide as we go. Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 8:30 a.m. to carpool, or arrange another place. Return late afternoon. Carol 822-2015.

November 11, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m.

"Linneaus, God's Registrar." Carolus Linnaeus was the most famous scientist of his time. With the possible exception of Albert Einstein, no other modern figure comes close to the level of recognition that he enjoyed with the general public. His monumental works on plants and animals are the starting point of the nomenclature of these groups. Look through any technical flora or treatment of animals and you will soon encounter Linnaeus, L., or (L.) as part of a scientific name. He named literally thousands of plants and animals, which led to his being called "God's Registrar." But there is so much more to this fascinating, if not entirely admirable, individual. Dr. James P. Smith, Jr., Professor of Botany, Emeritus, at Humboldt State University will review Linnaeus' life, the intellectual environment in which he worked, and his varied contributions to science. Why did he stop practicing medicine? Why were some of his botanical works banned? Was he a creationist? And, did he actually develop the system of naming plants and animals that we still use today?

December 10, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

Native Plant Show and Tell. Join us for an informal evening sharing photos, artifacts, readings, or food relating to native plants and their habitats. Donna Wildearth will show a native meadow she designed to replace a lawn. Dave Imper will show a wildfire in the home of the Lassics Lupine, one of our rarest plants. Jim and Virginia Waters will show photos of their latest trip. And there might be others! If you would like to share something, contact Michael at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 707-407-7686.

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